Road safety

IAM RoadSmart, a charity dedicated to reducing the number of people killed and seriously injured on the roads, is involved in lobbying for improvements in road safety standards and leading the road safety debate with central government and within the motoring community. IAM RoadSmart is an advocate for lifelong personal development of driving and riding skills.

Road Safety infographic

IAM RoadSmart analyses multiple issues and viewpoints when considering ways to improve road safety, not least those of its, 92,000 members. Human factors are one of these – how the driver (or rider) interacts with the journey, the vehicle and the external world – as highlighted by the 2016 government report on road casualties: “All accidents have a cause and that cause is often someone making a mistake or exhibiting dangerous or thoughtless road behaviour”.

The 2017 IAM RoadSmart Safety Culture Index, a study of UK motorists’ attitudes towards driving. The report highlighted that the main areas of concern amongst motorists (who took part in the survey), included: Using a mobile phone whilst driving, aggressive driving and drug driving.

IAM RoadSmart Human Factors

Whilst the UK has seen massive reductions in the number of people killed and seriously injured on the roads over the decades, that figure has plateaued at  just over 1,700 in recent years (reported road fatalities were 1,792 in 2016, 1,732 in 2015, 1,775 in 2014 and 1,713 in 2013. Reported serious injuries were 24,101 in 2016, 22,137 in 2015, 22,801 in 2014 and 21,657 in 2013).

Added to this, we are less than two decades away from driverless cars becoming popular on our roads. An important area of consideration is how driverless cars will exist on the roads alongside conventionally driven vehicles. What is certain is that the debate will not disappear as technology plays a bigger role in our motoring lives, and IAM RoadSmart will continue to play a central role in it.

IAM RoadSmart’s director of policy and research, Neil Greig, said: “Five years of flat lining road deaths is unacceptable. The huge gains in road safety made in the past now seem a distant memory. The government must show more leadership to really drive down road deaths in the future.”

News

IAM finds reductions in killed and seriously injured casualties in only a third of police force areas

Posted on 21/09/15 |

The Institute of Advanced Motorists (IAM) has obtained a breakdown of figures showing the numbers of people killed and seriously injured on roads in England and Wales for the last full year by police force area – showing which were the best and worst performing areas.

The figures show the full year figures by police force area for 2014 compared to 2013, and the percentage change from 2013.

Disappointingly only 14 areas out of 43 achieved any reduction on their 2013 figures. One area was unchanged in percentage terms (Cambridgeshire) while 28 all saw an increase.

Derbyshire was the only police force area to have an increase of more than 30% over the previous year. Three other areas increased by more than 20%; namely Leicestershire, Surrey and Wiltshire.

The top five worst performing areas were:

1.         Derbyshire – from 378 to 522 (up 38% from 2013 to 2014)

2.         Leicestershire – from 293 to 374 (up 28% from 2013 to 2014)

3.         Surrey – from 599 to 735 (up 23% from 2013 to 2014)

4.         Wiltshire – from 260 to 314 (up 21% from 2013 to 2014)

5.         Cheshire – from 461 to 548 (up 19% from 2013 to 2014)

Conversely Suffolk comfortably saw the greatest reduction over the previous 12 months, at 17%. The only other areas achieving a double-digit reduction were Durham and Gwent, at 14%.

The top five best performing areas were:

1.         Suffolk – from 291 to 242 (down 17% from 2013 to 2014)

2.         Durham – from 242 to 208 (down 14% from 2013 to 2014)

3.         Gwent – from 174 to 149 (down 14% from 2013 to 2014)

4.         City of London – from 60 to 55 (down 8% from 2013 to 2014)

5.         Metropolitan – from 2,267 to 2,115 (down 7% from 2013 to 2014)

Official 2014 figures showed there were 1,775 reported road deaths in 2014, an increase of 4% compared with 2013. The number of those killed or seriously injured in Britain increased by 5% to 24,582. There were a total of 194,477 casualties of all severities, an increase of 6%, the first increase in overall casualties in 18 years (reference 1).

Sarah Sillars, IAM Chief Executive Officer, said: “We want to make clear that a one year comparison cannot be taken as an overall trend of what might be happening in any particular area.

“However 2014 was not a good year for accidents and it should serve as a wake-up call to every road safety partnership that they are under scrutiny and road safety must remain a priority as public sector spending cuts continue. With official figures putting the cost to society of every fatality at over £1.7 million (reference 2), investment in road safety is money well spent.”

Sarah reiterated what the IAM would like to see happen when the new government review their road safety plan:

•           A reintroduction of road safety targets, which are the only clear way of ensuring reductions are measured and achieved.

•           A greater focus on driver and rider quality and incentives for companies and individuals to continuously develop their skills.

•           A focus on tackling pedestrian deaths, an area which is often ignored. The IAM believes that car technology and design should now shift from occupant protection to protecting the vulnerable outside cars.

•           The IAM also calls for better pedestrian facilities to segregate traffic and vulnerable users where speeds are high, and campaigns to educate pedestrians themselves as they are most often at fault in crashes.

The full table of those killed/seriously injured on the roads of England and Wales by police area is as follows:

Reported KSI casualties, by police force area, Great Britain, 2013-14

Area

2013

2014

% change

Avon and Somerset

503

497

-1%

Bedfordshire

219

235

7%

Cambridgeshire

393

395

-

Cheshire

461

548

19%

City of London

60

55

-8%

Cleveland

143

159

11%

Cumbria

239

231

-3%

Derbyshire

378

522

38%

Devon and Cornwall

647

721

11%

Dorset

362

390

8%

Durham

242

208

-14%

Dyfed-Powys

298

342

15%

Essex

689

757

10%

Gloucestershire

213

224

5%

Greater Manchester

656

717

9%

Gwent

174

149

-14%

Hampshire

1,031

1,063

3%

Hertfordshire

385

391

2%

Humberside

520

487

-6%

Kent

650

715

10%

Lancashire

784

859

10%

Leicestershire

293

374

28%

Lincolnshire

415

398

-4%

Merseyside

557

613

10%

Metropolitan

2,267

2,115

-7%

Norfolk

392

379

-3%

Northamptonshire

330

317

-4%

Northumbria

417

453

9%

North Wales

346

404

17%

North Yorkshire

534

506

-5%

Nottinghamshire

463

450

-3%

South Wales

326

368

13%

South Yorkshire

481

469

-2%

Staffordshire

213

223

5%

Suffolk

291

242

-17%

Surrey

599

735

23%

Sussex

922

1,030

12%

Thames Valley

929

1,015

9%

Warwickshire

288

315

9%

West Mercia

402

428

6%

West Midlands

895

950

6%

West Yorkshire

864

925

7%

Wiltshire

260

314

21%

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